A report on the breeding of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus macropus) at Mt Fyans 1976 – 2014 (Site B2)

Title

A report on the breeding of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus macropus) at Mt Fyans 1976 – 2014 (Site B2)

Author

Hurley, V.G.;

Keywords peregrine falcon
Download File 2014 Mt Fyans FINAL 2015 06 29.pdf 932kb
Abstract

Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus macropus are predator specialists that hunt other birds and kill their prey at the end of spectacular high speed dives called “stoops” (Frederick II, 1642).  Peregrines are listed as “rare” across Australia and “vulnerable” in Victoria under the Wildlife Act 1975.  Despite this, Victoria is considered the stronghold for this species in Australia.  One of the unique features of Peregrine Falcons, their nesting requirements, creates a limiting pressure on the population size.  In common with the other five Falco species found in Australia Peregrines do not build their own nest (eyrie) instead preferring to dig a shallow scrape on a rock ledge of a cliff face and lay their eggs in the depression created (see Fig. 1) (Ratcliffe, 1993).  This is a common form of nesting for many species of seabirds the world over (Marchant & Higgins, 1990).  Where Peregrines differ from most seabirds is that they nest high above sea level on the side of cliff faces.  Peregrines are widely distributed across Victoria found in all bioregions and where cliffs are absent will resort to nesting in the stick nest of other birds or tree hollows (Pruett-Jones et al., 1981).   

Publish Date 1st May 2015